Will Medicare Pay For A Walker?

Will Medicare Pay For A Walker?

Medicare Part B will pay for a walker if the device is NOT used for physical therapy or if the device is used by a patient who does not need physical therapy. Medicare will pay for a walker when it is prescribed by a physician and it is prescribed at the time of discharge from the hospital, skilled nursing facility, or rehabilitation center, for a patient who is not confined to a bed and who does not require skilled nursing or rehabilitation.

Medicare will not pay for a walker when it is used for physical therapy or when it is prescribed by a physical therapist. Medicare will not pay for a walker if the patient is confined to a bed, confined to a chair, or is in a rehabilitation center.

Medicare will pay for a walker if it is prescribed as a medical necessity by a physician for a patient who has a medical condition that results in an inability to ambulate independently (walk) without the use of upper extremity supports (arms and hands) and who needs assistance in walking.

In order for Medicare to pay for any medical device, the device must meet the definition of durable medical equipment (DME) as defined under Medicare regulations. A walker is classified as a mobility device (a cane or a crutch), and because it is not a piece of equipment designed for a specific medical purpose, it does not meet the definition of DME.

Even though Medicare will not pay for a walker, the walker may be covered by other insurance plans, including Medicare Advantage, managed care, and supplemental insurance.

Medicare will not pay for a walker if the patient is confined to a bed, confined to a chair, or being treated for rehabilitation by a physical therapist.

Medicare will not pay for a walker if the patient is confined to a bed, confined to a chair, or being treated for rehabilitation by a physical therapist. The above information is for informational purposes only and is not legal advice. You should consult a qualified attorney to determine your rights and legal obligations under the Medicare program and applicable State laws.

Medicare Payment for Walkers

According to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Medicare Part B will pay for a walker if it is prescribed at the time of a patient's discharge, if the patient is not confined to a bed, and if the patient does not require skilled nursing or rehabilitation. A walker may be prescribed at the time of a patient's discharge if the physician who performs his or her examination believes the patient will need the walker immediately after the patient leaves the hospital.

In order for Medicare to pay for any medical device, the device must meet the definition of durable medical equipment (DME) as defined under Medicare regulations. A walker is classified as a mobility device (a cane or a crutch), and because it is not a piece of equipment designed for a specific medical purpose, it does not meet the definition of DME. Also, Medicare will not pay for a walker if it is prescribed by a physical therapist or if it is used for physical therapy.

Medicare will not pay for a walker if it is used for physical therapy or if it is prescribed by a physical therapist. Medicare will not pay for a walker if it is used for physical therapy or if it is prescribed by a physical therapist. Medicare will not pay for a walker if the patient is confined to a bed, confined to a chair, or being treated for rehabilitation by a physical therapist.

Medicare will not pay for a walker if it is prescribed as a medical necessity by a physician for a patient who has a medical condition that results in an inability to ambulate independently (walk) without the use of upper extremity supports (arms and hands) and who needs assistance in walking. To be considered a medical necessity, the medical device must be indicated in the patient's plan of care and must be used as soon as the patient is discharged from the hospital. The physician who prescribed the device must be willing to follow the patient after discharge from the hospital.

Medicare will not pay for a walker if it is prescribed as a medical necessity by a physician for a patient who has a medical condition that results in an inability to ambulate independently (walk) without the use of upper extremity supports (arms and hands) and who needs assistance in walking. To be considered a medical necessity, the medical device must be indicated in the patient's plan of care and must be used as soon as the patient is discharged from the hospital. The physician who prescribed the device must be willing to follow the patient after discharge from

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