When Does Medicare Begin?

When Does Medicare Begin?

Medicare Part A begins at age 65.

Medicare Part B begins at age 65, or when you are eligible for Part A, whichever is later.

Medicare coverage depends on when you first sign up for the program.

Medicare Part A begins when you turn 65. You are not eligible for this coverage if you are still working at that age.

Medicare Part B begins when you are eligible for Part A or 65, whichever is later. If you are working you are not eligible for Part B. The only exception to this rule is if you are employed by a company with 20 or more employees. You can withdraw your enrollment in Part B when you turn 65. If you do not enroll in Part B when you turn 65, you will automatically receive a Part B card in the mail after you turn 65.

Part A is free and voluntary. Part B is not free. You pay monthly premiums for Part B. Medicare Part B also requires a yearly deductible. You do not have to pay this deductible until after you have paid your monthly Part B premium for the whole year.

You can eliminate the monthly premium for Part B if your income is below a certain level. For 2012, the monthly premium for Part B is $104.90 per month if you have not signed up for Medicare. If your income is below a certain level, you will not have to pay any premiums. If your income is below $80,000 you also do not have to pay a deductible for Part B.

If you are under age 65 and work for a company with 20 or more employees, you are eligible for Medicare in two years.

You may be eligible for Medicare if you are disabled.

Medicare is a federal program. The federal government sets the rules for the program.

Medicare is available for people who are 65 or older. People who are 65 or older may also use Medicare if they are disabled or have end-stage renal disease. Medicare is a federal program. The federal government sets the rules for the Part A and Part B programs, and sets payment rates for hospitals, doctors and other health care providers.

Other sections of the Medicare program are run by the states. Fourteen states run their own Medicare Advantage programs. The programs, called Medicare Advantage plans, are approved by Medicare.

Medicare Advantage (Part C) is the same as Parts A and B. It is offered by private companies approved by Medicare. You may also get your Medicare coverage through a Medicare Advantage plan. These plans are often known as Part C or Medicare Advantage plans.

There are four parts to Medicare. The parts are:

Part A: Hospital Insurance

Part A helps pay for inpatient hospital stays, skilled nursing facility care, hospice services and some home health care.

Part B: Medical Insurance

Part B helps pay for certain medical services, such as doctors' services, outpatient hospital care, home health care, medical equipment, prescription drugs and some preventive services.

Part D: Prescription Drug Coverage

Part D helps pay for prescription drugs.

Part C: Medicare Advantage

Part C helps pay for the same kinds of services as Parts A and B. It is sometimes known as Medicare Advantage.

Some people may qualify for extra help paying their Medicare Part B premiums and prescription drug costs.

If you receive Social Security, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits, you may qualify for Extra Help. This is a program that pays your Medicare Part D premiums and drug costs.

Part D helps pay for prescription drugs. Part D requires a monthly premium. People who get Social Security, SSI or RRB benefits may qualify for Extra Help. This is a program that pays your Part D premiums.

If you are eligible for Extra Help, a Medicare card will be sent to you. The card will tell you the amount of Extra Help you receive. If you want to continue receiving Extra Help, you must give your card to the drug plan that is a part of your Medicare Advantage plan. You can also give your card to the pharmacy if you take your Medicare prescription drugs.

If you are not eligible for Extra Help, you are responsible for paying your Part D premiums. However, the premium may be higher than the premium for people who get Extra Help.

Your Part D plan will tell you how much your premium is. Your plan will also tell you how to pay your premium.

If you do not have a Part D plan, you may pay your Part D premium to the Social Security Administration (SSA).

You may not get Social Security, SSI or RRB benefits if you refuse to enroll in a Part D plan. If you are eligible for Extra Help and you refuse to enroll in a Part D plan, you may lose your Extra Help and your Part B premium.

If you are age 65 or older, you are usually eligible for Medicare. You may be eligible for Medicare if you are blind or disabled.

If you are under age 65 and work for a company with 20 or more employees, you may be eligible for Medicare. You may be able to receive Medicare if you are a federal employee.

You may qualify for three kinds of Medicare coverage that are either free or you pay for. These are:

Medicare Part A

Medicare Part B

Prescription drug coverage

If you are eligible for Medicare, you will receive a card in the mail. The card will tell you your Medicare number.

You can also get a card on-line through the Social Security Administration.

You should carry your card with you. You will need it to show your insurance coverage.

You may get other cards from Medicare. These will be mailing cards. You will need to keep them with your cards.

If you have problems with your Medicare card, you can call the Medicare help line at 1-800-

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