Is Medicare Welfare?

Is Medicare Welfare?

More than six million low-income women of childbearing age are excluded from Medicaid coverage because they have not qualified for the Aid to Families With Dependent Children (AFDC) program.

By the time most of these women apply for Medicaid, they are pregnant.

Implementing Medicaid coverage of pregnancy and family planning services for women who are not eligible for AFDC would reduce the number of low-income women who needlessly bear children that they cannot afford to raise.

If Medicaid covered pregnancy and family planning services for these women, it would not save Medicaid a lot of money, because many of these women would use Medicaid even if they had to pay for care themselves.

But the Medicaid program would save money in the long run because the number of low-income mothers receiving prenatal care, and therefore the number of low-income children receiving care after they are born, would increase.

In addition, the women would not have to wait until they had a health problem before they could afford to see a doctor.

Thus, the women would receive preventive care and, thus, would be healthier.

As a result, they would have fewer complications during and after pregnancy and fewer birth defects in their children.

Reducing the number of low-income women of childbearing age who have no health insurance coverage for pregnancy and family planning services is a cost-effective way to reduce the number of low-income children who are born into poverty.

Will insurance coverage of contraception for young women lead to more out-of-wedlock births?

No.

Most women who use contraception do so to prevent pregnancy, and most users of contraception are married.

How long does the Medicaid program have to wait before a woman who has applied for Medicaid benefits becomes eligible?

States must cover pregnant women who are eligible for Medicaid under the AFDC program within three months of their application.

States must cover low-income children under Medicaid within one month of their application.

If a child is eligible for AFDC, how can the child's mother still be considered eligible for Medicaid?

A child who is eligible for AFDC may have a Medicaid-eligible mother who does not qualify for AFDC because she is a legal alien or has not been in the U.

S.

long enough.

Therefore, the child may be eligible for Medicaid, while the mother may not be.

The child may also be eligible if the mother is not eligible for AFDC because she works.

Under these circumstances, the child and the mother are eligible for Medicaid at the same time.

Under what circumstances is a pregnant woman not eligible for Medicaid?

A woman is not eligible for Medicaid until she has been in the U.

S.

for five years.

This prevents new immigrants from immediately tapping into the Medicaid program.

Even if a woman is not eligible for Medicaid, may she still receive Medicaid coverage for prenatal care if she gives birth in a hospital?

Prenatal care for pregnant women who are not eligible for Medicaid may be provided if the State agrees to pay for the care.

If the State agrees to pay, the woman must sign an affidavit stating that she will reimburse the Medicaid program for all costs incurred during the pregnancy, and that she understands that under State law she is responsible for paying for prenatal care after she leaves the hospital.

Once she leaves the hospital, the hospital may attempt to collect payment from the woman.

However, if the woman does not have the money to pay for prenatal care, the hospital may not have the right to collect payment.

The law requires the hospital to request assistance from the State in collecting payment, but the State may decline to help.

Before providing prenatal care to a woman who is not eligible for Medicaid, the hospital should ask her to sign this agreement and should make sure that the woman understands that she is responsible for paying for prenatal care after she leaves the hospital.

Does Medicaid pay for prenatal care for women who are eligible for Medicaid under the AFDC program but who have not applied for Medicaid?

Medicaid does not pay for prenatal care for women who are eligible for Medicaid but who have not applied for Medicaid.

Why not?

Medicaid, like other insurance programs, is designed to help people who have a health problem and do not have insurance coverage for the services.

The Medicaid program is not designed to provide insurance coverage for the services that people will need in the future.

In this case, the women who are eligible for Medicaid but have not applied for Medicaid are in the same situation they would be in if they did not have the financial resources to pay for Medicaid coverage.

They are not going to have a problem obtaining prenatal care if they do not apply for Medicaid.

What about women who are not eligible for Medicaid but who have not applied for Medicaid because they have not yet reached the five-year requirement?

If a woman has not applied for Medicaid because she is not eligible yet, the Medicaid program will not pay for her prenatal care.

However, if she gives birth in a hospital, Medicaid may pay for the care because Medicaid will reimburse the hospital.

What if a woman who is not eligible for Medicaid applies for Medicaid, but the State Department of Health and Human Services refuses to include her in the Medicaid program?

If the woman gives birth in a hospital and the hospital bills the Medicaid program, the Medicaid program must pay for the woman's prenatal care.

However, if the hospital tries to get paid by the woman, the hospital must follow State law in attempting to collect from her.

If the woman has no money, the hospital may not be able to collect from her, and the hospital may not be able to obtain payment from the Medicaid program.

What if a woman who is not eligible for Medicaid applies for Medicaid and the State Department of Health and Human Services allows her to stay in the Medicaid program but not for prenatal care?

If the woman gives birth in a hospital and the hospital bills the Medicaid program for her prenatal care, the Medicaid program must pay for her prenatal care.

However, the hospital must follow State law in collecting from the woman.

If the woman has no money and the hospital cannot collect from her, the hospital may not be able to obtain payment from the Medicaid program.

What if a woman who is not eligible for Medicaid applies for Medicaid but is not included in the Medicaid program?

If the.

LET'S GET STARTED

Get A Quote Now

Get a QuoteSpeak With a Licensed Agent Now*
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.