How Old To Be Eligible For Medicare?

How Old To Be Eligible For Medicare?

You get your first Part B premium-free if you're 65 or older when you enroll, and each month after.

If you enroll and then turn 65 during the year, you'll get Part B free for the rest of the year and throughout the month you turn 65.

If you enroll after you reach age 65, you'll get Part B free the month after you enroll.

The Part B monthly premium for 2018 is $134.00. If you're on Medicare due to a disability, the premium is $104.90. If you do not sign up for Part B when you first become eligible, and you later enroll, the premium is 10 percent more per year for as long as you have Part B.

If you want more information, you can read the Medicare booklet, “If You Are Considering Signing Up for Medicare.”

If you are already on Medicare, and your income is usually under $85,000 a year for an individual, or $170,000 a year for a married couple, you do not pay a premium. If you make over this amount, you may have to pay a small premium, depending on your income.

How do I enroll in Medicare?

If you are already on Social Security, you were automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A when you became eligible for Social Security. If you have not signed up for Part B, you can sign up in several ways. You can:

Go to the Social Security Administration office in person;

Call Social Security at 1-877-690-1012 (TTY 1-877-690-1012), or visit their website at www.ssa.gov to enroll;

Complete and return the application that is sent to you; or

Request an application be sent to you by calling Social Security at 1-877-690-1012 (TTY 1-877-690-1012).

If you have never applied, the time it takes to get your Medicare card will vary. Once you enroll, you should receive a letter with instructions on how to get your Medicare card.

If you have previously applied and received a denial, you have 60 days from the date of the denial letter to appeal the decision. For more information, call Social Security at 1-877-690-1012 (TTY 1-877-690-1012), or visit their website at www.ssa.gov.

What is a Part D plan?

When you enroll in a Part D plan, you can go to any pharmacy in the country to pick up your prescription drugs. Part D plans are designed to provide you with prescription drugs for an affordable monthly premium. Part D plans may also offer to pay for certain preventive services, such as blood pressure checks and flu shots, at no charge.

Part D premiums vary greatly depending on the plan you select, the area you live in, how many Part D drugs you take, and whether you receive some form of Extra Help — (Most low-income Medicare beneficiaries do not pay a premium).

For 2018, you pay a monthly premium of $32.90, plus a deductible amount, if any, and co-payments for your drugs. The deductible amount is usually a certain number of dollars that you pay for drugs before the Part D plan starts to pay for them. The amount of the deductible can change each year. The deductible amount ranges from $0 to $405 in 2018. Once you have met the deductible, you pay a co-payment for each prescription filled.

The Part D plan covers prescription drugs that are approved by Medicare and are available from a pharmacy. In general, there are four types of plans:

Prescription Drug Plan (PDP) –Offers prescription drug coverage for a monthly premium and a deductible amount.

–Offers prescription drug coverage for a monthly premium and a deductible amount. Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug Plan (MA-PD) – Offers prescription drug coverage for a monthly premium.

– Offers prescription drug coverage for a monthly premium. Generic Drug Universal Indemnity (GUDI) – Offers prescription drug coverage for a monthly premium, and the lowest of the prescription co-pays. This plan is offered by a single pharmacy.

– Offers prescription drug coverage for a monthly premium, and the lowest of the prescription co-pays. This plan is offered by a single pharmacy. Special Needs Plan (SNP)– Offers prescription drug coverage for a monthly premium, and the lowest of the prescription co-pays. This plan is designed for individuals with special needs.

You can also enroll in a Medicare Part D plan at any time. If you already have Medicare Parts A and B, and are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan or a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, you can switch to a different plan during an open enrollment period. You may also need to switch plans if your plan stops offering your drug.

As with Medicare Parts A and B, there is no Federal income or asset test for Part D. Therefore, individuals who have higher incomes and assets, including more than $8,880 in assets, can still purchase a Part D plan. An individual's assets include assets they own alone or jointly with another person and assets they own in trust for themselves.

What is an MA-PD plan?

An MA-PD plan is a type of Medicare Advantage plan with prescription drug coverage. These plans are offered by health insurance companies and other qualified organizations that contract with Medicare. MA-PD plans may cover services that are not covered by Original Medicare, including prescription drugs, and preventive services such as flu shots. MA-PD plans are also less expensive than many other Medicare Advantage plans because they provide drug coverage.

MA-PDs offer prescription drug coverage in two different ways:

Part D Prescription Drug Plan (PDP) – The plan offers the lowest of the prescription co-pays and the monthly premium.

– The plan offers the lowest of the

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