Does Medicare Pay For Mobility Scooters?

Does Medicare Pay For Mobility Scooters?

Medicare doesn't cover scooters but Medicare Part B will cover the costs of a scooter or wheelchair under the skilled nursing care benefit as long as the patient stays less than 20 days and needs the scooter or wheelchair to get around.

What types of scooters are Medicare approved for use in skilled nursing facilities?

The three types of scooters approved by Medicare are:

a. Self-propelled scooters

These are the most common types of scooters used in nursing homes. They are available in four types:

Standard – This is a basic scooter which is lightweight and easy to maneuver, which makes it good for long periods of use. The standard model can be folded when not in use, making it easy to store.

This is a basic scooter which is lightweight and easy to maneuver, which makes it good for long periods of use. The standard model can be folded when not in use, making it easy to store. Tilt-in-space – The tilt-in-space scooter is made for people who need maximum support and stability. It has two to four wheels and the tilt-in-space mechanism can be adjusted to any angle between 90 degrees and 180 degrees.

The tilt-in-space scooter is made for people who need maximum support and stability. It has two to four wheels and the tilt-in-space mechanism can be adjusted to any angle between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. Power – Power scooters are a bit more expensive but they are good for people who need more support and help with getting around. These scooters are equipped with a power seat and battery which allows them to be used anywhere. The batteries can be recharged at home or at a charging station in the facility.

Power scooters are a bit more expensive but they are good for people who need more support and help with getting around. These scooters are equipped with a power seat and battery which allows them to be used anywhere. The batteries can be recharged at home or at a charging station in the facility. Manual – These scooters are lightweight and are easy to maneuver. They are battery-powered and can be used outside and inside. However, they can't be used in long-term care facilities since they can only be used for 20 hours before charging.

b. Non-self-propelled scooters

These are available in two types:

Standard – This kind of non-self-propelled scooter is lightweight and can be easily folded for storage.

This kind of non-self-propelled scooter is lightweight and can be easily folded for storage. Power – Power options are more expensive than standard options but they are good for people who need more support and help with getting around. These scooters are equipped with a power seat and battery which allows them to be used anywhere. The batteries can be recharged at home or at a charging station in the facility.

Who needs to use a scooter or wheelchair?

If you have nausea, bed sores, or even difficulty walking, you may need a scooter or wheelchair. In order to get a wheelchair or scooter from Medicare, you must meet the following requirements:

You must be a Medicare beneficiary – Medicare Part B covers mobility equipment, such as mobility scooters, wheelchairs, and walkers.

You must be confined to a bed, chair, or other device because of a diagnosis of:

stroke

muscular dystrophy

Parkinson's disease

amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

multiple sclerosis

polio

spinal cord injury

cerebral palsy

arthritis

dysfunctional uterine bleeding

fracture of the hip or femur

hemiplegia

Huntington's chorea

neurological impairment

neurological impairement of the upper extremities

neurological impairment of the lower extremities

spinal cord impairement of the lower extremities

peripheral neuropathy

spinal arthropathy

congestive heart failure

congestive heart failure, requiring a cardiac pacemaker

severe aortic stenosis

severe mitral stenosis

severe valvular heart disease

congenital heart disease

critical pulmonary hypertension

pulmonary vascular disease

ventricular hypertrophy

myasthenia gravis

cardiac arrhythmia

cardiomyopathy

cardiopulmonary failure

myocardial infarction

pneumonia

peripheral vascular disease

pulmonary edema

neurogenic bladder

chronic renal failure

cerebrovascular disease

diabetes mellitus

spinal cord injury, requiring use of a wheelchair

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

You can't be confined to a bed, chair, or other device because you have a:

recent fracture of the hip or femur

recent fracture of the hip or femur, requiring the use of a plaster cast or plaster of paris cast

broken leg or foot

recent accidental amputation of the leg or foot

You can't get to a wheelchair or scooter by walking. If you have the use of one arm and one leg, you can get to a wheelchair by walking with crutches, a walker, or a cane.

You can't be able to get to a wheelchair or scooter by walking because you have a:

disabling cardiac condition

disabling pulmonary condition

disabling pulmonary condition requiring the use of oxygen

disabling pulmonary condition requiring the use of supplemental oxygen

disabling heart condition

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