Does Medicare Pay For Home Health?

Does Medicare Pay For Home Health?

Medicare will pay for home health care if it's one of your Medicare-covered services, which includes skilled nursing care and therapy. The home health agency must be Medicare-certified. Medicare pays for up to 100 hours of skilled nursing care and therapy each month, including the first 20 hours of skilled nursing care. Medicare will pay for medically necessary skilled care provided at home, such as wound care, incontinence care, cardiac care, respiratory care.

Find out what Medicare will pay for and learn more about Medicare-approved home health care.

Medicare Advantage plans also usually provide some type of coverage for home health care, but it may not be as much as 100 hours of care each month. Check with your Medicare Advantage plan to learn more about home health care coverage.

Buying home health care services

Medicare doesn't pay for all home health care services. If Medicare doesn't cover your services, you'll have to pay for them yourself, but depending on your income and assets, you may be able to get help paying for them.

You can buy a Medicare Advantage plan that covers home health care. You can also buy a stand-alone Medicare Advantage plan that covers home health care. You can also buy a Medigap plan or Medicare Part D plan that covers home health care.

Learn about Medicare Advantage plans, stand-alone Medicare Advantage plans, Medigap plans, and Medicare Part D plans.

Find out what Medicare won't pay for and learn more about Medicare-approved home health care.

Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B don't cover non-medical services, like housekeeping and meals. Learn more about what Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B cover.

Dentures and hearing aids

Medicare Part A coverage

Medicare Part A covers the cost of artificial teeth, dentures, or an eye-socket prosthesis. It also covers the cost of the first hearing aid you get after you turn 65. You'll pay a deductible, coinsurance, and a copayment for these items. The deductible is $183 in 2019. This means you pay the first $183 of the cost of your dental or hearing aid. For example, if you get an examination and fitting for dentures, you'll pay a copayment. The copayment for dental basic coverage is $28 in 2019. This means you pay a copayment for each dental visit. The copayment for dental major coverage is $64. For hearing aids, the first two fittings are free, but you'll pay a copayment for each hearing aid fitting. The copayment for hearing aid basic coverage is $42 and the copayment for hearing aid major coverage is $70.

Medicare Part B coverage

Medicare Part B covers the cost of a hearing aid if you have a medical need for it. The cost is up to $1,500 for the hearing aid and the hearing aid supplier's fee (the fee the supplier charges for fitting the hearing aid). If you have Medicare Part B and Medicare prescription drug coverage, you may be able to get help paying for a hearing aid if you have end-stage renal disease and are on dialysis.

Medicare Advantage plans may also cover dental services. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, see what it covers.

What Medicare won't pay for

Medicare Part A won't pay for hearing aids that aren't medically necessary.

Medicare Part B won't pay for hearing aids that aren't medically necessary, like hearing aids you use while playing golf or tennis.

Learn more about Medicare-covered hearing aids.

Medicare Advantage plans may also cover hearing aids. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, see what it covers.

Social Security disability insurance (SSDI)

If you have a disability that is expected to last at least a year, you may be eligible for Social Security disability insurance (SSDI). SSDI is a federal program.

SSDI is a monthly disability benefit paid by the federal government if you're under age 65. In most cases, you can't get SSDI unless you have Medicare. If you get SSDI, you'll get Medicare automatically.

Medicare Part A covers the cost of the first 100 days of inpatient hospital care due to your disability.

Medicare Part B covers the cost of outpatient care.

If you've already worked and paid into the Social Security system for at least 10 years, you're automatically eligible for Medicare benefits based on your work record. You don't need to apply for them. You can learn more about SSDI and Medicare from the Social Security Administration.

Workers' compensation

If you're injured on the job, you may be eligible for workers' compensation, paid for by your employer's insurance. Workers' compensation and Medicare coverage don't overlap.

If you get workers' compensation, Medicare will pay your Medicare Part B premiums.

Learn more about Medicare and workers' compensation.

Long-term care

If you need long-term care, you may qualify for Medicaid or a Medicare Advantage plan with a long-term care benefit.

Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal and state program that pays for long-term care. It's a needs-based program. The amount that you get depends on your income and assets. If your income and assets are too high, you won't qualify for Medicaid.

Medicaid covers a wide variety of services, including personal care services, medical care, and nursing home and other long-term care services. Medicaid also covers other services that are considered necessary for your health and well-being.

Although Medicaid is a needs-based

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