Does Medicare Pay For Glasses?

Does Medicare Pay For Glasses?

Medicare will cover the cost of eyeglasses if you have a medical condition. A medical condition is a problem with the eyes that can be corrected with glasses such as near-sightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and presbyopia. Medicare will also cover the cost of eye exams that are needed for glasses if you have a medical condition. Medicare will NOT cover the cost of eyeglasses or eye exams just because you need them. If you do not have a medical condition that requires glasses, you will not be eligible to have Medicare pay for your glasses.

Medicare will also NOT cover the cost of contacts, contact-lenses, or eye surgery.

Medicare Part B will cover the cost of eye exams if your doctor prescribes them. The reason for the exam will determine the cost. If your doctor prescribes an exam for a medical condition, Medicare will cover the exam and the cost of the eyeglasses. If the exam is needed to check for a medical condition, Medicare will cover the cost of the exam. If you are over age 65, you may have to pay a 20% co-insurance. If the exam is needed to check your eyes for other reasons such as monitoring for side effects from eye, cancer treatments, or other reasons, Medicare will NOT cover the cost of the exam. You will have to pay the exam fee and the cost of the eyeglasses.

Do you need an eye exam?

The following is a list of risk factors for age-related eye diseases. If you have any of these risk factors, you should have an eye exam every one to two years. The only way to prevent or slow the progression of age-related eye diseases is to have an eye exam.

• If you are 60 or older

• If you are a smoker

• If you have had diabetes or high blood pressure

• If you have a family history of macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts, or age-related macular degeneration

• If you are taking steroid or anti-inflammatory medications or have had recent eye surgery

• If you have been exposed to excessive sunlight

• If you have had a significant change in your vision

• If you have a history of falls or other trauma to your head or face

• If you have a history of joint pain

• If you have a history of chronic lung disease, emphysema, asthma, or other respiratory problems

• If you have had eye infection or inflammation

• If you are nearsighted

• If you have a family history of AMD, glaucoma, cataracts, or other age-related eye diseases.

After you have had an eye exam, you should know the following:

• If you have a medical condition that requires an eye exam for glasses

• If you don't have a medical condition that requires an eye exam for glasses

• If you need to have an eye exam again in the future

• If you need to wear glasses to correct your vision, how strong your glasses are, and the type of glasses you need

• If you need to take steps to protect your eyes, such as wearing sunglasses, limiting the time you spend looking at a computer, or wearing UV-blocking goggles

• If you need to take steps to prevent eye disease

• If you need to take steps to detect eye disease

• If you need to take steps to manage your eye disease

• If you need to take steps to protect your eyes from harm

• If you need an eye exam for your eye disease

• If your eye disease is under control

• If you need more treatment

• If you have any other eye problems such as glaucoma, cataracts, or macular degeneration

You can see a doctor who specializes in the eyes, an ophthalmologist, or you can see a retina specialist, an ophthalmologist who specializes in the retina (back of the eye). Both can do eye exams.

Do you need to see an ophthalmologist or an ophthalmologist who specializes in the retina?

The following is a list of risk factors for eye diseases that can be treated by an ophthalmologist.

If you have any of these risk factors, you should see an ophthalmologist.

• If you have had surgery on your eyes

• If you have had an injury to your eye

• If you have a deformity in your eye, such as a tumor or cataract

• If you have a history of eye surgery

• If you have a history of eye infection

• If you have a history of macular degeneration

• If you have a history of retinal detachment

• If you have a history of glaucoma

• If you have a history of diabetes

• If you have a history of high blood pressure

• If you have a history of kidney disease

• If you have a history of heart disease

• If you have a history of stroke

• If you have a history of cancer

• If you have had a recent injury to your eye

• If you have a family member with a history of eye disease, especially macular degeneration

• If you have a family member with a history of glaucoma

• If you have a family member with a history of cataracts

• If you have a family member with a history of retinal detachment

• If you have a family member with a history of breast cancer

• If you have a family member with a history of colon cancer

• If you have a family member with a history of colon polyps

• If you have a family member with a history of bladder cancer

• If you have a family member with a

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