Does Medicare Cover Hearing Aids 2019?

Does Medicare Cover Hearing Aids 2019?

Yes, Medicare covers hearing aids. Medicare Part B covers all medically necessary hearing aids except for a few special cases, such as a follow-up hearing test after a hearing aid has been fitted. Medicare does not cover hearing aids for people who do not have the required hearing loss.

Medicare may not cover 100% of the cost of hearing aids, but it will cover the greatest portion allowed by law. The portion you are responsible for paying depends on whether your hearing aids are classified as “hearing aids” or “hearing aid accessories.”

• If your hearing aids are classified as hearing aids, you are responsible for paying a $700 deductible each year. After you have paid the deductible, you will pay a $161 monthly fee for the rest of the year.

• If your hearing aids are classified as hearing aid accessories, you are responsible for paying the entire yearly cost up front.

If you are covered by Medicaid or a state aid program, you may be able to get your hearing aids covered 100% for the cost of the hearing aids. However, the hearing aids themselves will still be considered a durable medical good, which means they will be subject to the same deductibles as those used for other medical devices.

If you have Medicare and a Medicare supplemental plan, you will be responsible for paying a portion of the cost of any hearing aids that are not covered by your supplemental plan or by Medicare Part B.

If you are not covered by Medicare, you must purchase hearing aids through private insurance, which is really a private fee-for-service plan that covers the cost of the hearing aids and any related hearing services.

Your hearing aids may also be covered by your private insurance if the hearing aids are purchased through an audiologist who participates in the private fee-for-service plan. After you purchase your hearing aids, you must take your receipt to your audiologist who will submit the claim to your insurer.

Your private insurer may not cover hearing aids that are purchased outside of the fee-for-service plan.

Private health insurance does not cover hearing aids for people who do not have the required hearing loss.

Medicare Part B does not cover hearing aids for people who do not have the required hearing loss.

Some private insurance plans may cover hearing aids for people who do not have the required hearing loss.

You may not have to pay any money out of pocket for hearing aids or other related services, such as follow-up care, if you qualify for Medicare's Part A and Part B.

Medicare Part A covers hospitalizations. It also covers skilled nursing care, long-term care and hospice care at home or in a skilled nursing facility, as long as you have Medicare Part B.

Medicare Part B covers medically necessary services, such as doctor's visits, tests, x-rays, prescription drugs, medical supplies and durable medical equipment. However, Part B does not cover hearing aids for people who do not have the required hearing loss.

If you have private health insurance, you may be able to get your hearing aids covered 100% for the cost of the hearing aids. However, the hearing aids themselves will still be considered a durable medical good, which means they will be subject to the same deductibles as other medical equipment.

If you have Medicare Part A and Part B, you will be responsible for paying a portion of the cost of any hearing aids that are not covered by your supplemental plan or Medicare Part B.

Hearing aids are classified as durable medical equipment, which means they are subject to the same deductibles that are used for other medical equipment.

What are the monthly costs?

The monthly cost for hearing aids is $161 per month for hearing aids classified as hearing aids, and $700 for hearing aids classified as hearing aid accessories.

A $161 monthly fee will be charged for hearing aids classified as hearing aids. The $700 deductible for hearing aids will be charged after the first $161 is paid.

A $700 fee will be charged for hearing aids classified as hearing aid accessories. This fee will be paid up front.

What is the cost of a follow-up hearing test after a hearing aid has been fitted?

Medicare Part B covers a follow-up hearing test that is ordered by your doctor after you have been fitted with a hearing aid. A doctor will decide whether you need a follow-up test based on your hearing test results and the hearing aid's performance.

Medicare will not cover more than one hearing test each year.

What if I want to try hearing aids before I buy them?

Medicare Part B covers a hearing test to determine whether you need hearing aids. If it is determined that you do not need hearing aids, you will not have to pay anything out of pocket for the hearing test.

Medicare Part B covers a 50% discount on hearing aids and related services for people who are on Medicare and have a hearing loss, but are not yet ready to purchase hearing aids. (Hearing aids are considered a durable medical good, which means they are subject to a deductible, just like any other medical device.)

Medicare Part A covers a 50% discount on hearing aids and related services for people who are on Medicare and have a hearing loss, but are not yet ready to purchase hearing aids. (Hearing aids are considered a durable medical good, which means they are subject to a deductible, just like any other medical device.)

Medicare Part B covers a 50% discount on hearing aids and related services for people who are on Medicare and who do not have a hearing loss. (Hearing aids are classified as durable medical equipment, which means they are subject to the same deductibles as other medical devices.)

Medicare Part A covers a 50% discount on hearing aids and related services for people who are on Medicare and who do not have a hearing loss. (Hearing aids are classified as

LET'S GET STARTED

Get A Quote Now

Get a QuoteSpeak With a Licensed Agent Now*
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.