Do I Need Medicare If I Have Medicaid?

Do I Need Medicare If I Have Medicaid?

Medicare does not cover all hospital and medical expenses. Prescription drug coverage is not included. Many people choose to purchase Medigap insurance to cover the services not covered by Medicare. If you already have Medicaid, you do not need a Medigap plan.

What is Medicaid?

Medicaid is a federal program jointly funded by the federal and state governments to provide medical assistance to low-income people, including the aged, blind, and disabled. It is administered by the individual states but is designed to meet the same federal requirements.

Who is eligible for Medicaid?

States establish eligibility requirements for Medicaid. In general, most low-income individuals with very limited assets are eligible for Medicaid. The specifics of each state's Medicaid program, including income levels, are set by the state.

How long can I be on Medicaid?

The length of time you can be on Medicaid depends on the state you live in. In general, most states allow you to be on Medicaid as long as you qualify for SSI.

How much does Medicaid cost?

Medicaid is paid for by both state and federal funds. While the federal government provides a small reimbursement for Medicaid services to the states, the state pays for most of the Medicaid program. The cost of Medicaid varies from state to state.

What is the difference between Medicaid and Medicare?

Medicare is a federal health insurance program for people age 65 or older or people who are receiving Social Security Disability Insurance benefits. Medicaid is a federal and state health insurance program for people who have limited income and resources.

Is there a waiting period before I can get Medicaid?

The amount of time you must wait to qualify for Medicaid varies from state to state. In most cases, you must be both eligible for and receiving SSI to qualify for Medicaid. Qualifying for SSI takes time. To qualify for SSI, you must be aged or disabled. To be aged, you must be age 65 or older. To be disabled, you must have received Social Security disability benefits long enough to be considered disabled.

The amount of time it takes to be eligible for SSI depends on your age and whether you have worked in the past. In most cases, you must be age 65 or older to qualify for SSI. You must have worked enough to be insured for Social Security Disability Benefits to qualify for SSI. However, if you are under age 65, you may qualify for SSI if you have worked enough to be insured for Social Security.

If you are under age 65 and qualify for SSI, you must have worked for a total of at least 40 credits (usually one and a half years of work) to be considered insured for Social Security Disability. If you qualify for SSI because you are under age 65 and are insured for Social Security, you have only worked for 36 credits (usually one year of work), and you were receiving SSI at the time you applied for SSI, you may be eligible for Medicaid within five months. If you are automatically eligible for SSI and are receiving SSI, you may be eligible for Medicaid within three months. If you are automatically eligible for SSI and are receiving SSI, you may be eligible for Medicaid within three months.

If you qualify for SSI because you are over the age of 65, you must have worked for 40 credits (usually one and a half years) to be insured for Social Security. If you qualify for SSI because you are over the age of 65 and are insured for Social Security, you must have worked for 36 credits (usually one year) to be eligible for Medicaid. If you qualify for SSI because you are over the age of 65 and are receiving a pension from the Railroad Retirement Board, you must have worked for 40 credits (usually one and a half years) to be insured for Social Security and eligible for Medicaid.

There is also a Medicaid program for people who meet the age and disability requirements for SSI who can't get SSI because they do not have enough work credits to qualify for SSI. If you are old enough to receive SSI but don't have enough work credits, you can get help from the Supplemental Security Income/SSI – Disabled Adult Children program. This program is designed to help people who have not worked enough to qualify for SSI but have worked enough to be insured for Social Security Disability.

The SSI/SSI-D program provides Medicaid coverage for people who are not eligible for SSI because they do not have enough work credits. Monthly income limits for SSI/SSI-D are less than those for SSI and are based on your state. If you are over the age of 65 and not eligible for SSI because you don't have enough work credits, you can get Medicaid under the SSI/SSI-D program.

However, if you are under the age of 65 and not eligible for SSI because you do not have enough work credits, you may be eligible for Medicaid under the Qualified Disabled Working Individuals Program.

If you are blind and you have not worked enough to be insured for Social Security, you may be eligible for Medicaid under the SSI/SSI-D Blindness program.

If you have worked enough to be insured for Social Security but have not worked enough to qualify for SSI, you may qualify for Medicaid under the SSI/SSI-D medically needy program.

If you are eligible for Medicaid under the SSI/SSI-D medically needy program but your state has not chosen to provide Medicaid coverage for people eligible under the medically needy program, you may be able to get Medicaid under the Qualified Disabled Working Individuals program.

How can I get Medicaid coverage?

To get Medicaid, you must apply for SSI. The Social Security Administration (SSA) must determine whether you are eligible for SSI. To apply for SSI, you need to fill out an application and get it signed by a doctor. The doctor signs the

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