Are Green Card Holders Eligible For Medicare?

Are Green Card Holders Eligible For Medicare?

No. Green card holders are not eligible for medicare.

A green card holder who is 65 or older, or disabled is, however, eligible for medicare if he or she has been a resident of the United States for five or more years. You are treated, for medicare purposes, as a resident of the United States during any period you are a nonresident alien and have a valid immigrant visa or equivalent, have a statement from DHS saying that you have applied for adjustment of status, or have been granted adjustment of status.

A green card holder who is 65 or older and is a resident of the United States for five or more years may also be eligible for part B of medicare without paying a premium.

To be eligible for part B without paying a premium the green card holder must have received a full social security benefit for the months of the last three months before he or she was 65.

To learn more about how you can get part B without paying a premium, see the section "How do I get part B" in the article on this site entitled, "How do I get health insurance if I am 65 or older?

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How do I get a green card?

For information on how to get a green card, visit the United States Department of Homeland Security website at http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis. You can also call the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services at 1-877-690-1012.

CR-1 and CR-2 Visas for Spouses of United States Citizens

There are special visas for the spouses of United States citizens. Spouses of United States citizens who are not eligible for adjustment of status can get one of these visas. Spouses of United States citizens who are eligible for adjustment of status can also get one of these visas.

There are two different visas for spouses of United States citizens: the CR-1 Visa and the CR-2 Visa. This article explains the CR-1 Visa. The CR-2 Visa is very similar to the CR-1 Visa. To learn about the CR-2 Visa, see the article on this site entitled, "Spouse of a United States Citizen: CR-2 Visa."

To get a CR-1 Visa, the spouse of a United States citizen must file form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. After the form I-130 is approved, the spouse of a United States citizen is given a "Packet 3." The spouse must complete the form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, and the form I-864, Affidavit of Support Under Section 213A of the Act, inside the green card packet. The spouse of a United States citizen must also complete form I-485 and the form I-864 for his or her children, if any.

The spouse of a United States citizen must also complete form G-325A, Biographic Information. Then, the spouse of a United States citizen must submit the I-130 and the I-485, with the I-864, G-325A, and the marriage certificate to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services will send the spouse of a United States citizen a Notice of Action, with a receipt notice and instructions for how to proceed to get a CR1 Visa.

If the green card application is approved, the spouse of a United States citizen will receive a CR-1 Visa.

CR-1 Visa for Spouses of United States Citizens and Children

A spouse of a United States citizen may bring certain unmarried children under age 21 to the United States. The spouse must file form I-130 and the spouse must be approved for a CR-1 Visa.

A child of the spouse of a United States citizen can also get a CR-2 Visa. To get a CR-2 Visa, the child must file form I-130 and the child must be approved for a CR-2 Visa.

To bring a child to the United States, the child must be unmarried and under age 21. The child must also be the biological child of the spouse of the United States citizen or the child of the spouse of the United States citizen must have been legally adopted by the United States citizen or the child of the United States citizen must have been legally adopted by the spouse of the United States citizen.

If the child of the spouse of a United States citizen is a stepchild, he or she must have lived in the household of the spouse of a United States citizen for at least two years before the spouse of a United States citizen became a United States citizen.

If the child of the spouse of a United States citizen is the biological child of the spouse of a United States citizen, then the child must have lived in the household of the spouse of the United States citizen for at least two years before the spouse of a United States citizen became a United States citizen.

If the child of the spouse of a United States citizen was legally adopted by the spouse of the United States citizen, then the child must have lived in the household of the spouse of the United States citizen for at least two years before the spouse of the United States citizen became a United States citizen.

The child of the spouse of the United States citizen must be unmarried and under age 21. The child must also be a biological child of the spouse of the United States citizen or adopted by the spouse of the United States citizen or the child must have been adopted by the spouse of the United States citizen.

If the child is legally adopted by the spouse of the United States citizen, then the child must have lived in the household of the spouse of the United States citizen for at least two years before the spouse of the United States citizen became a United States citizen.

CR-1 Visa for Spouses of United States Citizens and Parents and Grandparents

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